Saturday, August 15, 2020

Diabetes & Yoga

Benefits of Yoga for Diabetes
Everyone benefits from yoga - if they undergo proper training and continue with the
practice. Regular practice of yoga benefits the body in the following ways which :
It improves digestion, circulation, and immunity
Yoga enhances function of neurological and endocrine organs
It can prevents and provides relief from chronic illnesses

Overall the body feels healthier, more energetic

Here are few specific asanas to tackle diabetes better:
1.Kapal Bhati (Skull Shining breathing technique)
2.Supta Matsyendrasana (Lying-down body twist)
3.Dhanurasana (Bow pose)
4.Paschimottanasana (Seated forward bend)
5.Ardhya Matsyendrasana (Sitting half spinal twist)
5.Shavasana (Corpse pose)

1.Kapal Bhati pranayama (Skull Shining breathing technique)
Yoga for Diabetes
The Skull shining breathing technique helps energize the nervous system and rejuvenates brain cells. It is very helpful for patients suffering from diabetes, as it stimulates abdominal organs. This pranayama also improves the blood circulation and uplifts the mind.

2.Supta Matsyendrasana (Lying-down body twist)
The Lying-down body twist massages the internal organs and improves digestion. This posture also exerts pressure on the abdominal organs and is hence very helpful yoga posture for people suffering from diabetes.

3.Dhanurasana (Bow pose)
The Bow pose strengthens regulates the pancreas and is highly recommended for people with diabetes. This yoga pose also strengthens the abdominal muscles and is a good stress and fatigue buster.

4.Paschimottanasana (Seated forward bend)
The Two-legged forward bend massages and tones the abdominal and pelvic organs, and helps people suffering from diabetes. This yoga posture helps balance the prana in the body and also calms the mind.


5.Ardhya Matsyendrasana (Sitting half spinal twist)
The Sitting half spinal twist massages the abdominal organs, increases the oxygen supply to lungs and makes the spine supple. It also helps calm the mind and improves blood flow to spine.

6.Shavasana (Corpse pose)
The final resting yoga pose, Corpse pose, takes the body into a deep meditative state, letting it relax and rejuvenate.

Friday, August 14, 2020

Symptoms & Causes of Diabetes

What are the symptoms of diabetes?
Symptoms of diabetes include

increased thirst and urination
increased hunger
fatigue
blurred vision
numbness or tingling in the feet or hands
sores that do not heal
unexplained weight loss
Symptoms of type 1 diabetes can start quickly, in a matter of weeks. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly—over the course of several years—and can be so mild that you might not even notice them. Many people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms. Some people do not find out they have the disease until they have diabetes-related health problems, such as blurred vision or heart trouble.

What causes type 1 diabetes?
Type 1 diabetes occurs when your immune system, the body’s system for fighting infection, attacks and destroys the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Scientists think type 1 diabetes is caused by genes and environmental factors, such as viruses, that might trigger the disease. Studies such as TrialNet External link are working to pinpoint causes of type 1 diabetes and possible ways to prevent or slow the disease.

What causes type 2 diabetes?
Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of diabetes—is caused by several factors, including lifestyle factors and genes.

Overweight, obesity, and physical inactivity
You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you are not physically active and are overweight or obese. Extra weight sometimes causes insulin resistance and is common in people with type 2 diabetes. The location of body fat also makes a difference. Extra belly fat is linked to insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and heart and blood vessel disease. To see if your weight puts you at risk for type 2 diabetes, check out these Body Mass Index (BMI) charts.

Insulin resistance
Type 2 diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which muscle, liver, and fat cells do not use insulin well. As a result, your body needs more insulin to help glucose enter cells. At first, the pancreas makes more insulin to keep up with the added demand. Over time, the pancreas can’t make enough insulin, and blood glucose levels rise.

Genes and family history
As in type 1 diabetes, certain genes may make you more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. The disease tends to run in families and occurs more often in these racial/ethnic groups:

African Americans
Alaska Natives
American Indians
Asian Americans
Hispanics/Latinos
Native Hawaiians
Pacific Islanders
Genes also can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes by increasing a person’s tendency to become overweight or obese.

What causes gestational diabetes?
Scientists believe gestational diabetes, a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy, is caused by the hormonal changes of pregnancy along with genetic and lifestyle factors.

Insulin resistance
Hormones produced by the placenta NIH external link contribute to insulin resistance, which occurs in all women during late pregnancy. Most pregnant women can produce enough insulin to overcome insulin resistance, but some cannot. Gestational diabetes occurs when the pancreas can’t make enough insulin.

As with type 2 diabetes, extra weight is linked to gestational diabetes. Women who are overweight or obese may already have insulin resistance when they become pregnant. Gaining too much weight during pregnancy may also be a factor.

Genes and family history
Having a family history of diabetes makes it more likely that a woman will develop gestational diabetes, which suggests that genes play a role. Genes may also explain why the disorder occurs more often in African Americans, American Indians, Asians, and Hispanics/Latinas.

What else can cause diabetes?
Genetic mutations NIH external link, other diseases, damage to the pancreas, and certain medicines may also cause diabetes.

Genetic mutations
Monogenic diabetes is caused by mutations, or changes, in a single gene. These changes are usually passed through families, but sometimes the gene mutation happens on its own. Most of these gene mutations cause diabetes by making the pancreas less able to make insulin. The most common types of monogenic diabetes are neonatal diabetes and maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). Neonatal diabetes occurs in the first 6 months of life. Doctors usually diagnose MODY during adolescence or early adulthood, but sometimes the disease is not diagnosed until later in life.
Cystic fibrosis produces thick mucus that causes scarring in the pancreas. This scarring can prevent the pancreas from making enough insulin.
Hemochromatosis causes the body to store too much iron. If the disease is not treated, iron can build up in and damage the pancreas and other organs.
Hormonal diseases
Some hormonal diseases cause the body to produce too much of certain hormones, which sometimes cause insulin resistance and diabetes.

Cushing’s syndrome occurs when the body produces too much cortisol—often called the “stress hormone.”
Acromegaly occurs when the body produces too much growth hormone.
Hyperthyroidism occurs when the thyroid gland produces too much thyroid hormone.
Damage to or removal of the pancreas
Pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, and trauma can all harm the beta cells or make them less able to produce insulin, resulting in diabetes. If the damaged pancreas is removed, diabetes will occur due to the loss of the beta cells.

Medicines
Sometimes certain medicines can harm beta cells or disrupt the way insulin works. These include
niacin, a type of vitamin B3
certain types of diuretics, also called water pills
anti-seizure drugs
psychiatric drugs
drugs to treat human immunodeficiency virus
pentamidine, a drug used to treat a type of pneumonia External link
glucocorticoids—medicines used to treat inflammatory illnesses such as rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis
anti-rejection medicines, used to help stop the body from rejecting a transplanted organ
Statins, which are medicines to reduce LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels, can slightly increase the chance that you’ll develop diabetes. However, statins help protect you from heart disease and stroke. For this reason, the strong benefits of taking statins outweigh the small chance that you could develop diabetes.

If you take any of these medicines and are concerned about their side effects, talk with your doctor.

Miscellaneous Things Related With Diabetes

How common is diabetes?
As of 2015, 30.3 million people in the United States, or 9.4 percent of the population, had diabetes. More than 1 in 4 of them didn’t know they had the disease. Diabetes affects 1 in 4 people over the age of 65. About 90-95 percent of cases in adults are type 2 diabetes.1

Who is more likely to develop type 2 diabetes?
You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you are age 45 or older, have a family history of diabetes, or are overweight. Physical inactivity, race, and certain health problems such as high blood pressure also affect your chance of developing type 2 diabetes. You are also more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you have pre-diabetes or had gestational diabetes when you were pregnant. Learn more about risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

What health problems can people with diabetes develop?
Over time, high blood glucose leads to problems such as

heart disease
stroke
kidney disease
eye problems
dental disease
nerve damage
foot problems

Different Types of Diabetes

What are the different types of diabetes?
The most common types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes
If you have type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. Your immune system attacks and destroys the cells in your pancreas that make insulin. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, although it can appear at any age. People with type 1 diabetes need to take insulin every day to stay alive.

Type 2 diabetes
If you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not make or use insulin well. You can develop type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. However, this type of diabetes occurs most often in middle-aged and older people. Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes.

Gestational diabetes
Gestational diabetes develops in some women when they are pregnant. Most of the time, this type of diabetes goes away after the baby is born. However, if you’ve had gestational diabetes, you have a greater chance of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. Sometimes diabetes diagnosed during pregnancy is actually type 2 diabetes.

Other types of diabetes
Less common types include monogenic diabetes, which is an inherited form of diabetes, and cystic fibrosis-related diabetes

What is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Blood glucose is your main source of energy and comes from the food you eat. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps glucose from food get into your cells to be used for energy. Sometimes your body doesn’t make enough—or any—insulin or doesn’t use insulin well. Glucose then stays in your blood and doesn’t reach your cells.

Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause health problems. Although diabetes has no cure, you can take steps to manage your diabetes and stay healthy.

Sometimes people call diabetes “a touch of sugar” or “borderline diabetes.” These terms suggest that someone doesn’t really have diabetes or has a less serious case, but every case of diabetes is serious.

Wednesday, August 5, 2020

Healthy Drinks

In the beginning, there was water—abundant, refreshing, providing everything the body needs to replenish the fluids it loses. Humans relied on it as their only beverage for millions of years. Milk was introduced with the advent of agriculture and the domestication of animals. Then came beer and wine and coffee and tea, all consumed for taste and pleasure as much as for the fluids they provide. The newcomers—sugary beverages including soda, sports drinks, and energy drinks—offer hydration but with a hefty dose of unnecessary calories that the body may have a hard time regulating. Alternatively, “diet” drinks offer sweetness without the calories, but does that make them a healthy choice?



With so many options, it’s easy to be confused about which beverages are best for our health. Follow the links below for an in-depth look at each, but if you’re short on time, here’s the takeaway:

Water is the best choice for quenching your thirst. Coffee and tea, without added sweeteners, are healthy choices, too.
Some beverages should be limited or consumed in moderation, including fruit juice, milk, and those made with low-calorie sweeteners, like diet drinks. Alcohol in moderation can be healthy for some people, but not everyone.
It’s generally best to avoid sugary drinks like soda, sports beverages, and energy drinks

Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Health Literacy

Health Literacy is defined in the Institute of Medicine report, Health Literacy: A Prescription to End Confusion,(link is external) as "the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions."

Health literacy requires a complex group of reading, listening, analytical, and decision-making skills, as well as the ability to apply these skills to health situations. For example, it includes the ability to understand instructions on prescription drug bottles, appointment slips, medical education brochures, doctor's directions and consent forms, and the ability to negotiate complex health care systems.

More recent definitions focus on specific skills needed to navigate the health care system and the importance of clear communication between health care providers and their patients. Both health care providers and patients play important roles in health literacy. The number of different definitions for health literacy demonstrate how the field has evolved.